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Background

Why yeast cells undergo apoptosis

Apoptosis is an evolutionally conserved cell suicide program used by various organisms to selectively eliminate dangerous, superfluous, or damaged cells. Since the first description of apoptosis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by F. Madeo, several orthologues of crucial mammalian apoptotic proteins have been discovered. Still, the phenomenon of yeast cells undergoing apoptosis has long been controversial, in part because of doubts of whether cell suicide could constitute an advantage for unicellular organisms. However, the evolutionary benefit of a suicide program in yeast is underscored by accumulating studies describing yeast apoptosis during ageing, mating, sporulation, or colony development and, thus, giving a unicellular organism causes to die for.

 

 

Physiological scenarios of yeast apoptosis. Wild-type yeast cells die altruistically in times of dwindling resources during chronological aging, after attack by killer toxins from nonclonal enemy strains, and as a result of unsuccessful mating (Büttner et al. 2006).

Contact

Workgroup leader
Humboldtstrasse 50/EG 8010 Graz, Austria
Univ.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Frank Madeo Phone:+43 (0)316 380 - 1507
Fax:+43 (0)316 380 - 9898

Contact

Alterung & Zelltod - Labor Frank Madeo - Sekretariat
Humboldtstrasse 50/EG 8010 Graz, Österreich
Eveline Chatzatoglou, Isabella Wilfing Phone:+43 (0)316 380 - 5620
Mobile:+43 (0)316 380 - 5665
Fax:+43 (0)316 380 - 9898

Mo-Do: 08:30-12:00
Freitag geschlossen

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